Behind the Scenes on One Mile Creek

Behind the Scenes on One Mile Creek

Apart from the community cleanups and litter-free Mardi Gras campaign, there's a lot of work we're doing behind the scenes on One Mile Creek to assess just exactly how much of an impact we are making. 

Mobile Baykeeper Comments on Proposed Wetland Fill in Dog River Watershed

Wetlands fill both sides of this photo of Dog River. These vital areas protect from storm surge, flooding, shoreline erosion, and stormwater runoff pollution.

We recently submitted comments to the United States Army Corps of Engineers and the Alabama Department of Environmental Management (ADEM) regarding the application to fill nearly five (5)  acres of wetlands in the Dog River Watershed to expand a housing development.

We have significant concerns with the amount of wetlands proposed to be filled in the Dog River Watershed, a predominantly developed watershed, that faces constant threats from flooding, shoreline erosion, storm surge, stormwater runoff, and other water quality issues.

You can write your own letter here or by scrolling to the end of this blog post. You will also find a copy of Mobile Baykeeper's comments included at the bottom of this page.

Why is this important?

Dog River is a vital resource in Coastal Alabama for many reasons. It is home to both full-time residents and visitors. Its local restaurants serve fresh, delicious seafood that come straight from the river. It serves as a favorite pastime for many families who spend their days swimming, fishing, boating, and playing on the river. The river plays a crucial role to the health and well-being of our community, environment, and economy. For these reasons we have concerns about filling these wetlands.

What has been done?

The Dog River Watershed Management Plan (DRWMP) was recently published by Mobile Bay National Estuary Program. This plan uses scientific analysis and input from all types of stakeholders, residents, businesses, MAWSS, environmental organizations (including Dog River Clearwater Revival and Mobile Baykeeper) and others within the Dog River Watershed to show the issues impacting the watershed. It also provides clear strategies to reduce pollution and improve water quality.

The wetlands proposed to be filled are part of a vital area of wetlands recommended to be preserved by the WMP.

More generally, the WMP recommends acquiring and preserving existing natural wetlands and creating constructed stormwater wetlands...not filling them. The plan states “The overall health of the greater Dog River Watershed depends upon the existence of its wetlands.” And goes on to say that the watershed has suffered from a drastic loss of wetlands and highlights that the greatest loss of wetlands in the Watershed has occurred as a result of filling wetlands for development.

“Although the loss and conversion of habitat is challenging and expensive to reverse, it is critical to protect and preserve remaining areas of ecological significance such as forests, wetlands, and stream floodplains, which provide a natural filter for pollutants, pathogens, sediment, etc. Failure to protect these wetlands, shorelines, marshes, and forests will exacerbate negative impacts described throughout this WMP.”                  

-Dog River Watershed Management Plan

The evidence in the Watershed Management Plan makes it clear why additional wetland fill in the Dog River Watershed will have serious negative effects on water quality and the safety and resilience of communities, infrastructure, and resources located within the watershed.

Mobile Baykeeper's main concerns include:

A map based on National Weather Service models shows storm surge potentials in the Dog River watershed. Filling more wetlands will only make these storm surges more severe.

  • The location of the proposed project is a major concern. The Dog River Watershed is plagued with several issues including flooding, storm surge, shoreline erosion and water quality degradation; any amount of wetland fill will worsen these problems. Furthermore, the proposed wetlands to be filled are considered highly ecologically important to the watershed as a whole.

  • To fill wetlands you must show that there are no other practical alternatives. Houses do not have to be built in wetlands and, in the case of this application, it is clear that the applicant hasn't done everything practical to avoid wetlands.

If this application is approved:

  • Mobile Baykeeper urges the Corps to require the applicant to fund restoration and preservation projects identified within the Dog River WMP to fulfill the mitigation requirements. When wetlands are filled, the developer is required to mitigate (lessen) the harm caused by this wetland fill. The Dog River WMP clearly spells out needed restoration and preservation projects in the watershed. If these wetlands are filled, the harm that is caused by that fill can be lessened, or mitigated, by funding these critical projects.

  • Mitigation should preferentially seek to restore nearby wetlands. Performing required mitigation nearby helps ensure the least negative impact to water quality in the watershed.

  • Appropriate protection measures should be clearly demonstrated to ensure red clay doesn't fill Halls Mill Creek and Dog River during construction. For protection of the watershed and nearby residents, we strongly encourage the incorporation of Low Impact Development practices into the project to the maximum extent.

  • To minimize negative impacts, inspections should be conducted - at least twice a week and after any rainfall of 0.50 inches or greater and a comprehensive plan be created to lay out best management practices and monitoring activities for the project.

In Summary

The Dog River Watershed Management Plan was created to be an active guide for policy makers, watershed resource managers, and decision makers to strategically manage and protect the watershed. We rely on the health and beauty of Dog River for swimming, fishing, boating, delicious seafood, property values, and so much more.  

Mobile Baykeeper urges the Corps to not dismiss the concerted effort made in the WMP and adequately consider it when evaluating this application. Given the above concerns, Mobile Baykeeper recommends denial of this wetland fill application.


Want to write your own letter to encourage these wetlands be protected and not filled?

We've spelled out our main concerns in the pre-drafted letter below. Feel free to edit it until it fits your concerns or just hit send to send your own letter to the Corps and ADEM recommending that they follow the Dog River Watershed Management Plan and protect these important wetlands!

Everything You Need to Know About Our Lawsuit with Daphne Utilities

Everything You Need to Know About Our Lawsuit with Daphne Utilities

Last month, we filed a lawsuit against Daphne Utilities for not reporting sewage spills and violating the Clean Water Act. Here’s everything you need to know to get caught up:

300 Community Members Come Together for MLK Day of Service

300 Community Members Come Together for MLK Day of Service

Chilly temperatures in the low 30s didn't stop more than 300 community members from coming together to give back to the community and honor Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. 

Mobile Baykeeper Files Lawsuit Against Daphne Utilities for Clean Water Act Violations

Mobile Baykeeper Files Lawsuit Against Daphne Utilities for Clean Water Act Violations

The utility has failed to comply with its permit by falsely reporting, failing to report, and underreporting sewer spills into local rivers, creeks, and bays. 

Local Students #getSWAMPed: 4 Schools, 4 Watersheds, and 500+ Students Later!

Local Students #getSWAMPed: 4 Schools, 4 Watersheds, and 500+ Students Later!

AmeriCorps Members Angelica Howard and Leslie Revel, also known as the "SWAMP Ladies", recap their first few months at the helm of our rapidly expanding watershed awareness and monitoring program. 

6 Reasons You Should Attend Our 20th Anniversary Bay Bash on December 8

6 Reasons You Should Attend Our 20th Anniversary Bay Bash on December 8

We said we’re kicking Bay Bash up a notch this year, and we meant it. But just in case you need a little more convincing, here are 7 reasons why you should attend our 20th Anniversary Bay Bash this Friday

Mobile Baykeeper Submits Comments on Bayou La Batre Sewage Permit

Mobile Baykeeper Submits Comments on Bayou La Batre Sewage Permit

Significant problems have plagued oyster harvesting in Portersville Bay for years and water quality remains a major issue in the area. ADEM now has the opportunity to solve many of the problems facing Portersville Bay and its water quality issues affecting oyster harvesting. This can only take place if ADEM works with other agencies, local businesses – especially the seafood industry and aquaculture – and local citizens and includes all relevant studies and data in the permitting process.

Our Pending Lawsuit Against Daphne Utilities: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Our Pending Lawsuit Against Daphne Utilities: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

On September 19, we filed a 60-day notice of intent (NOI) to sue Daphne Utilities for several violations under the Clean Water Act, including falsely reporting sewer spills and failing to report sewer spills. Learn everything you need to know about this pending lawsuit in our "Frequently Asked Questions" blog. 

Success During Our First Marine Debris Removal on One Mile Creek

Success During Our First Marine Debris Removal on One Mile Creek

We promised volunteers our Marine Debris Removal on One Mile Creek would not be “your average cleanup,” and it certainly lived up to its name!  This event served as the official kickoff for a two-year grant we received from NOAA to help Mobile “Move Toward a Litter-Free Mardi Gras”. 

Submit Your Comments on Bayou La Batre Sewage Permit

Submit Your Comments on Bayou La Batre Sewage Permit

The Bayou La Batre sewer plant NPDES permit is being reissued by the Alabama Department of Environmental Management (ADEM). The public can comment on this permit until Friday 11/10.

Mobile Baykeeper is writing comments centered around one main idea; the permit needs to be protective of oyster farming!

We encourage you to submit your own comments about the permit to ADEM.

Mobile Baykeeper Awarded $91,000 EPA Grant to Expand Watershed Program into South Mobile County

Mobile Baykeeper Awarded $91,000 EPA Grant to Expand Watershed Program into South Mobile County

Funding will enable Baykeeper to expand watershed education and monitoring program into South Mobile County at Alma Bryant High School. 

Fish River Protected From Sewer Line Under River

Fish River Protected From Sewer Line Under River

Thanks to the amazing response from the community and comments by Mobile Baykeeper the project was modified. The sewer line that is now in place was "hung" from the County Road 32 bridge, where a break or spill would be obvious and quickly fixed, a WIN for clean water and Fish River community members! This victory is clear proof that YOU can affect change!

Thank You Nickelle Stoll for Nearly 4 Years of Dedication to Mobile Baykeeper!

Three and a half years ago, Nickelle Stoll joined the Mobile Baykeeper team just in midst of the craziness that is the Publix Grandman Triathlon – and we didn’t scare her away! She started at Baykeeper as our Partnership Coordinator before moving into the Operations Manager position while also serving as the Volunteer Coordinator for our fundraising events.

As Operations Manager, she’s been a constant champion of our work, the joy of our team, and has threaded everything together to keep us learning and growing bigger and better each year. She has always kept us in line, dotting our I’s and crossing our T’s while working quietly behind the scenes to make sure everything runs as smoothly as possible around the office.

We are very sad (and a little terrified) to see her go, but she has decided to shift positions to work in a similar role for the South Alabama Volunteer Lawyer’s Program. We know she’s moving to a team that needs her and we feel confident that she will continue to grow and thrive in the future.

Nickelle and her incredible family - Spencer, William, and Dan - will remain vital and well-loved members of the Baykeeper team and we know they always remain an integral part of our larger Baykeeper family in the future. We are working on setting a date and time to celebrate Nickelle and her years of dedication to Baykeeper, and as soon as we have something confirmed, we will let you know. She will be with us for a few more weeks before transitioning to her new position, so please feel free to reach out to her and share how much she has meant to you at nstoll@mobilebaykeeper.org.


Now Hiring: Operations Manager

Nickelle’s shoes will be very hard to fill, but now we are beginning the search for a new candidate. Please click here to view the official position announcement so that we can begin working to replace her. If you know anyone that would be a good fit for this position, please encourage them to apply. Please send a resume and cover letter to callaway@mobilebaykeeper.org. For more information, call the office at 251-433-4229.