Continued Groundwater Pollution at Gadsden Proves That Cap-in-Place Does Not Work

Continued Groundwater Pollution at Gadsden Proves That Cap-in-Place Does Not Work

Alabama Power currently plans to cap-in-place all their coal ash pits statewide. We at Mobile Baykeeper maintain that this is not an effective solution - and now we have Alabama Power’s own reports, as well as a maximum fine from the Alabama Department of Environmental Management (ADEM), to back us up.

Where Is It Safe to Swim in Lower Alabama? There’s an App for That.

Where Is It Safe to Swim in Lower Alabama? There’s an App for That.

Mobile Baykeeper started Swim Where It’s Monitored (SWIM), a program through which local communities can sponsor bacteriological monitoring at sites of their choosing. Once a week during warmer (swim season) months, and once a month during winter, the Baykeeper AmeriCorps Patrol Team collects water quality data at each of these sponsored sites.

Alabama Power Receives Maximum Fine for Capped-in-Place Coal Ash Pit Leaking Arsenic, Radium into Nearby Groundwater

Alabama Power Receives Maximum Fine for Capped-in-Place Coal Ash Pit Leaking Arsenic, Radium into Nearby Groundwater

rsenic and radium are still leaking from Plant Gadsden’s unlined coal ash pit after Alabama Power closed it using the cap-in-place method. This is the same method the utility plans to use for Plant Barry’s coal ash pit, located just 25 miles north of Mobile on the Mobile River. The Alabama Department of Environmental Management (ADEM) proposed the maximum fine of $250,000 for Alabama Power’s violations at Plant Gadsden.  

The Endangered Species of Mobile Bay and the Alabama Gulf Coast

The Endangered Species of Mobile Bay and the Alabama Gulf Coast

Today is Endangered Species Day! Did you know that Mobile and Baldwin Counties are home to 23 species on the Threatened or Endangered Species List? Learn all about them on our blog!

First Annual SWAMP Bi-County Conference

First Annual SWAMP Bi-County Conference

Please join us on Tuesday, April 30, 2019, from 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. at the Weeks Bay Resource Center for our first Strategic Watershed Awareness and Monitoring Program (SWAMP) Bi-County Conference.

The First SWAMP Bi-County Conference Is Tomorrow

(Fairhope, Ala.) - Please join us on Tuesday, April 30, 2019, from 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. at the Weeks Bay Resource Center for our first Strategic Watershed Awareness and Monitoring Program (SWAMP) Bi-County Conference. During this conference students from five area high schools – Alma Bryant, Citronelle, LeFlore, Vigor, and Fairhope – will be presenting their watershed projects.

The BP Oil Disaster: 9 Years Later

The BP Oil Disaster: 9 Years Later

Today marks the 9-year anniversary of the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill, when over 200 million gallons of oil surged through the Gulf of Mexico for 87 days. The State of Alabama released an excellent progress report last year noting dollars spent on restoration, projects moving forward, data being collected, and prospects for the future. The more challenging part to explain is what it took to get here.

Nine Years After BP: Where Are We?

(Mobile, Ala.) - April 20, 2019, will mark the 9-year anniversary of the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill, when more than 200 million gallons of oil surged through the Gulf of Mexico for 87 days. The State of Alabama released an excellent progress report last year noting dollars spent on restoration, projects moving forward, data being collected, and prospects for the future. The more challenging part to explain is what it took to get here.

A Ban on Bans: Alabama Legislature Proposes Statewide Prohibition of Bans on Plastic Waste

(Mobile, Ala.) - Last week, Alabama House Rep. Ledbetter and Alabama Senators Livingston, Reed, Waggoner, Marsh, Chambliss, Givhan, Butler, Scofield, Whatley, Price, and Smitherman will introduce House Bill 346 (HB346) and Senate Bill 244 (SB244), respectively. Both bills would prohibit local communities from deciding how to deal with plastic waste. The Bills are an overstep by the state government into local communities' rights that will have a negative impact on our economies and natural resources.

Magnolia Springs Ramps Up Partnership with Mobile Baykeeper's SWIM Program

(Mobile, Ala.) - The Town of Magnolia Springs is clearly happy with Mobile Baykeeper: they are renewing and expanding their partnership this year with an additional SWIM site. Swim Where It's Monitored (SWIM) is a water quality monitoring program that informs citizens of the safety of their favorite swimming and fishing spots. In 2018, Magnolia Springs became the first municipality to sponsor a site to inform and protect their citizens.

Volunteer Testimonial February 2019

“Last year, Mobile Baykeeper started the Litter-Free Mardi Gras campaign, and it was the most substantial volunteer opportunity I have experienced. This campaign allowed me to see first hand the impact Mardi Gras has on our local waterways.”

-an excerpt from “The Mardi Gras Epiphany” by Boris Kresevljak, Mobile Baykeeper AmeriCorps Member, Volunteer Engagement Program

Flooding in the Delta Highlights Threat of Catastrophic Coal Ash Spill

Flooding in the Delta Highlights Threat of Catastrophic Coal Ash Spill

Alabamians deserve clean water just as much as other citizens in the Southeast. Leaving toxic coal ash within a few hundred feet of a major river that is prone to severe flooding is simply nowhere near protective enough. Mobile Baykeeper will fight ardently for coal ash removal until Alabama Power commits to dig it up and move it so Mobile Bay, the Mobile-Tensaw Delta, our local economy, and our communities are safe.

Flooding in the Delta Highlights Threat of Catastrophic Coal Ash Spill

(Mobile, Ala.) - On January 7 2019, during the height of flooding in the Mobile-Tensaw Delta, Mobile Baykeeper staff flew with SouthWings over the Delta to observe Alabama Power’s 597-acre unlined coal ash pit. More than 21 million tons of toxic coal ash in the pit is only held back by an earthen (dirt) dam and views from the air and the river show flood water dangerously covering as much as 15 feet of the 25 foot dam. 

20 Years Together Working for Clean Water

20 Years Together Working for Clean Water

Mobile Baykeeper has succeeded all these years, however, because of your willingness to get involved when asked, write a check when it was needed, and speak up and get engaged on the issues that mean the most to you. We will continue to make a difference because of your continued involvement and investment in our work.