SWAMP in Schools

Through our Strategic Watershed Awareness and Monitoring Program (SWAMP) we educate students on the importance of a healthy watershed, how their actions can impact water quality, and what they can do to protect it. The initial presentation covers watershed basics, threats to water quality, the importance of clean water to our environment, economy, and quality of life, and how concerned citizens can safeguard our precious water resources. If we have sufficient funding, we train and certify interested students as water quality monitors using Alabama Water Watch's (AWW) EPA-approved methodology. They upload their monitoring data into the Alabama Water Watch database and the Water Rangers web tool, where information on water quality trends is available to everyone. Based on the data they analyze, students then determine a real-world solution to implement to improve their local water quality.

 
 
 

LeFlore High School

2017-19 school years

439 students

32 certified water quality monitors

Funded by the Gulf of Mexico Alliance and the Environmental Protection Agency’s Gulf of Mexico Program

Students monitored their local waterways throughout the school year. After analyzing data and seeing issues first-hand, they decided to tackle the problem of roadside litter by raising awareness with social media. They created a Facebook page called Litter-Free LeFlore and ran online video ads across Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, and Google partner sites.

Alma Bryant High School

2017-19 school years

1,342 students

39 certified water quality monitors

Funded by the Environmental Protection Agency Environmental Education grant

Students monitored their local waterways throughout the school year. After analyzing data and seeing issues first-hand, they decided to tackle the problem of oil in the water, namely at the marina. They requested a sign be placed at the marina reminding boaters to maintain their vessels. They will also place storm drain markers around the school to create schoolwide awareness that only water goes down the drains.

Citronelle High School

2017-19 school years

528 students

17 certified water quality monitors

Funded by AM/NS Calvert

Students monitored their local waterways throughout the school year. After analyzing data and seeing issues first-hand, they decided to tackle the problem of roadside litter, namely near an overpass. They requested a sign be placed on the road to inform drivers that the creek below is maintained by Citronelle High School’s SWAMP Team. Their goal was to create awareness that roadside litter will eventually enter the local creeks, streams, and rivers.

Accel Charter School

2017-19 school year

55 students

Funded by Southern Partners Fund

Fairhope High School

2017-19 school years

624 students

84 certified water quality monitors

Funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Bay Watershed Education and Training grant

Students monitored their local waterways throughout the school year. After analyzing data and seeing issues first-hand, they decided to tackle the problem of construction site stormwater runoff. Baldwin County is one of the fastest growing counties in the state. The students monitored near a new neighborhood with several new homes being built. While they found little trash on the ground, they did notice some construction sites were not properly maintained. Students created a flyer to distribute to citizens in new neighborhoods informing them on what to look for at a construction site along with how to report improper sites.

Vigor High School

2018-19 school years

158 students

Funded by the Mobile Bay National Estuary Program and the Gulf of Mexico Alliance

After Vigor High’s SWAMP Team monitored sites around their school, they noticed a trend in high bacteria levels. Their solution was to write a letter of concern to the Prichard Water Works & Sewer Board. This letter included data on bacteria levels at the monitoring sites. It also described the problems caused by the high bacteria levels and the reasons why the bacteria levels could be so high. They hope that they will be able to involve the Prichard Water Works and Sewer Board to find a solution to this problem.

Murphy High School

2019-20 school year

173 students

Funded by Dog River Clearwater Revival and the Environmental Protection Agency’s Gulf of Mexico Program

 

Baker High School

2017-19 school years

282 students

Funded by Mobile Baykeeper members

Dixon Elementary School

2017-18 school years

140 students

Funded by Mobile Baykeeper members

Fairhope Intermediate School

2017-18 school years

250 students

Funded by Mobile Baykeeper members

Grand Bay Middle School

2017-19 school years

553 students

Funded by Mobile Baykeeper members

Mary B. Austin Elementary School

2017-19 school years

440 students

Funded by Mobile Baykeeper members

Rosinton Elementary School

2017-19 school years

319 students

Funded by Mobile Baykeeper members

Saraland Middle School

2017-19 school years

339 students

Funded by Mobile Baykeeper members

Scarborough Middle School

2017-18 school years

200 students

Funded by Mobile Baykeeper members

Carroll Intermediate School

2017-18 school years

30 students

Funded by Mobile Baykeeper members

Castlen Elementary School

2017-19 school years

194 students

Funded by Mobile Baykeeper members

Clark-Shaw Magnet School

2018-19 school years

225 students

Funded by Mobile Baykeeper members

Daphne High School

2017-19 school years

117 students

Funded by Mobile Baykeeper members

E.R. Dickson Elementary School

2017-18 school years

150 students

Funded by Mobile Baykeeper members

Foley Elementary School

2017-19 school years

249 students

Funded by Mobile Baykeeper members

Mobile County Training School

2017-18 school years

25 students

Funded by Mobile Baykeeper members

Williamson High School

2018-19 school years

47 students

Funded by Mobile Baykeeper members

Covenant Christian Middle School

2018-19 school years

23 students

Funded by Mobile Baykeeper members

Chastang Middle School

2017-18 school years

90 students

Funded by Mobile Baykeeper members

Council Elementary School

2017-18 school years

100 students

Funded by Mobile Baykeeper members

Denton Middle School

2017-18 school years

101 students

Funded by Mobile Baykeeper members

Fonde Elementary School

2017-19 school years

254 students

Funded by Mobile Baykeeper members

Lott Middle School

2017-18 school years

54 students

Funded by Mobile Baykeeper members

Rockwell Elementary School

2017-18 school years

30 students

Funded by Mobile Baykeeper members

 
 
 
AmeriCorps Alabama.png

This work would not be possible without our AmeriCorps Members on the SWAMP team. Thank you, AmeriCorps and ServeAlabama!