Strategic Watershed Awareness & Monitoring Program (SWAMP)


Program Coordinator Cade Kistler uses a hands on activity to educate students on sources of water pollution.

Program Coordinator Cade Kistler uses a hands on activity to educate students on sources of water pollution.

We believe educating citizens and students on the importance of a healthy watershed and how their actions can impact water quality is vitally important, and we also believe many citizens want to take action to protect their watershed but are unsure how to do so. To meet this need, we created the Strategic Watershed Awareness and Monitoring Program (SWAMP).

SWAMP begins by educating participants on the role and importance of watersheds. The initial presentation covers watershed basics, threats to water quality, the importance of clean water to our environment, economy, and quality of life, and how concerned citizens can safeguard our precious water resources.

Program Director Jason Kudulis takes a water chemistry sample on Eslava Creek.

Program Director Jason Kudulis takes a water chemistry sample on Eslava Creek.

After the educational component, interested individuals are trained and certified as water quality monitors using  Alabama Water Watch's (AWW) EPA-approved methodology. Monitors choose a site on a local waterbody and begin monitoring at least monthly. The results of the monitoring provide valuable data to understand more about our local water resources and what threats may be facing them. If poor water quality or pollution problems are identified, Mobile Baykeeper will work with the monitor(s) and relevant stakeholders to find a solution.

Water quality monitoring data is uploaded into the Alabama Water Watch database and into the Water Rangers web tool where information on water quality trends is available to anyone. The web tool also allows users to report pollution as it is identified throughout local waterways. 

Water Rangers innovative web tool provides a user-friendly, visually appealing method for entering water quality and other relevant data about local waterbodies.

Water Rangers innovative web tool provides a user-friendly, visually appealing method for entering water quality and other relevant data about local waterbodies.

Thanks to a generous grant from AM/NS Calvert, Mobile Baykeeper was able to begin and pilot SWAMP in the Citronelle community. To date, more than 1,200 individuals have received the educational presentation throughout Mobile and Baldwin Counties, including 73 students from Citronelle High School who participated in the educational presentation. 11 of these 73 students have also been trained as water monitors through SWAMP in conjunction with AWW. These students are now monitoring water chemistry monthly as part of an in-school activity. Students use critical thinking and problem solving skills to interpret data, formulate hypotheses, and explore what factors may be contributing to their results. Mobile Baykeeper will work closely with these students to help examine and understand the results of their water quality testing which include: pH, Dissolved Oxygen, Alkalinity, Hardness, Water Temperature, Turbidity, and Pathogens. In the near future, SWAMP will be presented to Citronelle community members.

#GetSWAMPed

If you are interested in learning more about SWAMP, please contact Education and Outreach Coordinator Jamie Bullock for more information.